click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130313
20130321
STATION
CNBC 28
CNNW 6
KGO (ABC) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 49
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
the markets are in a bubble right now, and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. but there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or over shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing that we have a resilient economy that is growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february, rising 1.1%, the best numbers since september. analysts were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and
. treasury secretary said he doesn't think the markets are in a bubble right now and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing we have a resilient economy growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february rising 1.1%, the best number since september. analysts were worried about the impact of gasoline prices and increase in the payroll tax for us but consumers still spending money. important that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. if you're looking for something new to buy samsung will be happy to oblige vowing galaxy 4, 5 inch screen, larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch but hover your fingers over. it's the main competition. >>> with markets setting new records every day and federal reserve meeting next week, what could happen next and what should you do with your money. randy kroszner, the
tryg to time thearke gyrations. >> overall you think the stronger than expected economy is what is going to power the market to higher levels, to that 1700 that you see in the s&p 500. but which specific sectors of the market do you think will lead the way? >> well, i like most of the cyclicals better than the defensive stocks, tyler. i think as the market keeps going higher, more and more people are underallocated to economic sensitivity. so i really like the manufacturing stocks, the industrials, and the basic materials. i think the financial stocks ve done well and wil coinue to dwe. an i would look at trying to put a little bit into technology stocks that have been really bad for the last year. i think i'm seeing confidence in ceos rise and capital spending going up, and i think that sector could come to life yet in the second half of this year. >> jim, as you know, federal reserve policymakers are meeting on tuesday. do you -- nobody is really expecting any significant change in policy. but do you expect any change in tone and conversation? and how might that impact investo
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
different and so much better in the economy then. the economy, i remember it well. jobs were plentiful, easy to get. we had people hiring in everything from technology to finance, manufacturing, housing, retail was smoking. 1996 we were at the cusp of the technological revolution where the internet was just beginning to take hold of the consciousness of entrepreneurs. i was running my hedge fund back then and at the same time starting thestreet.com which remains an important focus for me now. i started the street because i envisioned a world where your personal computer married to a phone line could get instant information about stocks that you cared about. not just the ones that the day-old newspapers cared or even the television. the era where people would be able to buy or sell a stock with a key stroke using a personal computer with very low commission rates was just getting under way. what a remarkable time that was. the last time we were up so many days, okay? for the dow, that time. when you had a brand new pentium powered pc with microsoft windows and netscape browser and an america
here. you've got the good economy. tremendous housing numbers, miraculous retail sales, terrific oil and gas markets. you have the bad economy. weakening commodity prices. slow commercial real estate business. really bad world commerce outlook. real soft information technology sales. you mix them all up together and you get the absolute perfect environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping 7.8%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition in bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor. and a genuine scholar of american financial history. it's what he does best. he knows that 1937 after three years of 12% economic growth
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
and i think most of the country, greta, hear the president's articulated view of the economy, they hear the same rhetoric that led illinois to be a financial basket case. chase revenues, the revenues underperform. don't deal with the underlying spending problems and now what's going on in illinois? almost 10 billion dollars in unpaid bills, almost the second highest per capita debt of any state in the union, higher than average unemployment rate, a downgrade in the credit rating and all of these things are exactly what president obama portends as he articulates he needs more and more and more reven revenue. when you said that to him what did he say? >> look, barack obama is an incredibly skilled guy as relates to these types of questions. when it came down to it, he doesn't have an answer because there is no answer. >> what did he say to you? >> he said oh, it's a bipartisan problem in illinois and goes back and wants to relitigate illinois history, but i think what his challenge is, how to create a bipartisan agenda in this -- in this town when what he's doing is redefining terms. so,
that i actually like the economy here and have liked it ever since the fiscal cliff was resolved. sure we got some hiccups. mastercard saying they have degradation. we recognize that china has got its head handed to it of late and the united kingdom is now joining italy, france, greece, spain, and taking another step down. geez, it's ugly out there. >> the house of pain! >> i can scream every time someone asks about when the fed is going to take the punch bowl away. i wish that analogy had never been coined. but i have to now doubt -- i've got to doubt, there's no doubt, there's no doubt that there will be a tough moment for this market when ben bernanke changes his stance, even if the economy is humming. i just don't know what level that top will come from. maybe it comes from dow, i don't know, like 16,000, or what the rest of the employment picture will look like. because we do know the federal government is pulling back from job creation fast and furious. oh, by the way, i don't like that north korea just undid the hard fought armistice with south korea or that the new leader wants to
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
a gloomy new report on the state of retirement savings. >> the recent headlines about the economy as we've talked about have been pretty good but the lingering effect of the great recession is that a lot of americans have had to dip into their savings to get by. and of course that could be a problem in the years to come for many americans. they're supposed to be the golden years. but a new report says retirement like this is way out of reach for most americans who just aren't socking away enough. even with markets near record highs, the confidence workers have in their retirement is low. the employee benefit research institute found that 49% of americans aren't sure they'll be able to retire comfortably and they're not doing much about it. >> it's one of the scariest things is that it is not just that people don't have a lot of retirement savings. it's they don't know what they need. they don't know what they don't have. so, you know, what you would like to see is more people really sitting down with an adviser doing some hard math. instead, people seem to be crossing their fingers and
in a big way, whether it is a game changer and what that means for the market and the economy and everything else. i know we'll be talking about it it at noon. >> we're going to get our last word. they can talk about it for just one second and not that long because we've only got a minute and we'll talk to henry blodget and curtis artledge. you asked a question about jc penn penney. maybe they can raise more cash, but they're running out of cash at this point. they don't have that much left. >> you have a final thought on either jc penney or more importantly, the markets? >> i think today's entire discussion has been about the early stages of confidence building and we get past these two gigantic minefields of fiscal cliff and sequester. we start to see m & a pickup and retail sales and they're willing to spend money because they're more scared about their job. we see capital expenditures and people starting to plan for them and sentiment, actually, when we talk about it i don't think there's that much complacency. people are still nervous. >> scott, it was great having you he
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
production and find out how much capacity to utilize in march. speaking of the markets and the economy, our own steve liesman caught up with new treasury secretary jack lew yet. among the topics discussed, whether there is a reason to worry about a bubble right now. >> the analysis i've seen doesn't give me reason to be worried right now. i think one of the lessons we learned from 2008, 2009 is that even when things are not a problem, we always have to ask those questions. we need to make sure that our -- we have the transparency to see what's going on in firms, in markets. we need to have the regulatory tools to deal with problems as they develop. >> and we're going to talk more about the markets and questions about a potential bubble later on this morning. we've got a great guest lineup today, guys. named money manager bill miller of legg mason and former fed chairman alan greenspan. we're going to find out if he sees any similarities between today's environment and the situation back in 1996. the last time we had this kind of run when he gave his now famous irrational exuberance speech.
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
of this economy and i think we'll be pleasantly surprised when we get this housing starts number. of course, the fed bull from hell crowd will ratchet up their bets. that lightning will strike on wednesday if they see a strong number. and i think they will be, unfortunately, unpleasantly surprised when they see it because nobody in that crowd wants to see any good. i actually like things that are good. old fashioned. housing's so strong that it's lifting all boats including brunswick by the way and the housewares. so let's listen to william sonoma conference call on their earnings on tuesday to be sure the carryover's intact. now, i'm thinking this may be long in our ever expanding great index or maybe it's the greater gatsby index. i once bought a pot for like $200. it was a big, round cast iron, red thing and then i saw it at the jersey shore outlet for almost half the price. and i am still kicking myself. eighth anniversary, nothing's changed. now, we use a ton of gauges to measure things like retail sales and employment around here that are bottoms up, meaning we look at what individual
sanctions ever. it's having a significant effect. >> on the economy? >> there is the president of the united states saying it could take a year for iran to develop a nuclear weapon. let's discuss what is going on. that's the first time i heard the president give such a specific timeline, within a year or so iran could have a nuclear weapon. that sounds pretty ominous. >> it does sound ominous. what it shows you is what a difficult diplomatic challenge the president has. because they're negotiating with iran through the six-party talks which are taking place in kazakhstan and there the united states has made some offers that are, you know, trying to help iran move to a kind of win-win place. now he is managing the other dimension of this which is israel. he is trying to convince the israelis that he is serious, that he sees that there is not an infinite amount of time, and he said later in the interview all options are on the table. when i say all options i mean military force and we have substantial capabilities. so he's trying to manage the iranian clock as well as the israeli clock. >> so
states' economy -- housing is uniquely american. a lot of building products go into homes made right here. think about all the people who touch a home and away from its permit to its sale, builders, laborers, people who make piping, windows, doors, stoves, air conditioning, sinks, toilets, showers, baths, and, of course, electric and plumbing. then there's all the white collar jobs, the banks, sales, lawyers, they all get paid. and the retailers who need to make the place great. to me we will look back on this moment and recognize that while the whoever republican do you say rules imposed on the cypriots certainly damaged confidence in europe and the euro once again, what actually might have mattered in america is that the housing boom was picking up steam at the same time. i know, stupid. brilliant! so what am i asking for here. i'm trying not to be too positive or negative. but i'm definitely playing the skeptic. i worry about what i know and even worry about what i don't know. but most important, i want to emphasize what could drive the market either way. and the bottom line is, i thin
and i'm concerned if i see the strength in the economy and i see the stocks of companies that benefit from higher rates benefit than the ones getting hurt, then the fed's got to see it, too, right? i think we've come a long way when the fed was clueless and ben bernanke knew nothing. here's the bottom line. the charts say higher rates are coming and they're coming faster than we realize because of a rising economy. that's not going to be slowed by cyprus in particular or europe or even china. that means you got to sell the consumer packaged goods and wait for a price break to buy the insurers like the metlife. sure, the charts can be wrong, but not every single one of them. stay with cramer. >>> coming up, game time. cramer's got a new take on an old favorite family pastime. all this week, he's taking a look at companies with a stranglehold on their industries that may give their stocks a boost. tonight jim's checking out the friendly skies to find out if it's time to take off. [singing] hoveround takes me where i wanna go... where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll b
to see right now. we have a $14 trillion economy with $13 trillion of demand. the government is not making up the difference. if the government stops, will the economy collapse? maybe republicans will be happy because there will be a reserved army of 25 million unemployed people and as for the middle class, that's going to be over. >> we're not talking about jobs that are not necessary. i mean, when i come down your way, as i offered to come down to atlanta, we need insfra structure redevelopment. we're talking about bridges, tunnels, infrastructure that needs repair, needs to be dealt with, jobs that are needed. we're not just talking about charity here. >> indeed. >> look, i have five children -- >> this is not like the works public administration where some of the jobs that were created during the great depression weren't immediately necessary. i love some of those artworks but you can argue that those weren't necessary. but infrastructure spending is absolutely necessary. we are running so far behind. some of our biggest international competitors, like the chinese. >> rig
is not to chase a balanced budget just for the sake of balance. my goal is how do we grow the economy, put people back to work and if we do that, we'll be bringing in more revenue if we've controlled spending and we've got a smart entitlement package, then potentially what you have is balance but it is not balance on the backs of the poor the elderly students who need student loans families who have got disabled kids. that's not the right way to balance our budget. >> stay away from entitlement reform because it is a fraud. >> stephanie: yeah. [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: jim, guess what's good about paul ryan's budget? >> nothing. >> stephanie: guess what's bad about paul ryan's budget? everything. >> wow! you got two in a row right! >> unusual. >> stephanie: i did that with a sledgehammer. would you like the fun facts that think progress brings us the five worst things. i'm not going to go into the details. number one huge tax cuts to the rich and corporations. there is a shock. number two forces seniors to pay more for healthcare. number three cuts food stamps. >> that sounds cra
of the economy more than most and was gratified proctor cooled yesterday, k kimberley cooled. >> there is the sentiment, some anxiety things have been quiet, almost tranquil in a way. >> it's a western? the man who shot liberty prokt sfer. >> invariably something always comes. i don't know whether it will be. geopolitical as we worry or wonder or watch things in iran or north korea. i know. i'm just -- >> 1996. it was pretty darn good for a while. wasn't until the asian contagion, nine months later. >> then we got long term capital, then the fed lowered rates by 50 basis rates. off to the races like never before, ever. that being said, this is 20 13. not 1996. >> we're doing stress testing on banks like we weren't doing back then. we'll get more results tonight. >> we don't have the internet just beginning to blossom. >> no, but we do have situations where -- i'm reading about the elephant in the room which is the galaxy. suddenly they've got a keyboard -- i've been trying to get that keyboard. it does not get me wrong every single time. it remembers what i've got, what i wan
jobs balancing the budget and trying to get our economy moving again. >> stephanie: why won't the president help us kill more poor people? >> we have a mulch shortage in this company. >> stephanie: why won't the president compromise on that. >> make sure there is more money for bronzer. >> the republicans want to balance the budget, the president doesn't. the republicans want to solve our long-term debt problem, the president doesn't. we want to unlock our energy resources to put america back to work. the president doesn't. but i hope these kinds of discussions can continue -- >> stephanie: that made no sense at all. >> we need more oil spills and more dead poor people. but it was a good start. >> stephanie: how it is a good start. the boner one more time. >> i thought we had a very candid and frank exchange of ideas, and frankly i think it was productive. >> frankly. productive. as long as we get rid of more tax cuts for orange rich people. >> stephanie: margaret in texas. hello margaret? okay. scott in massachusetts. she was enjoying the show at least. hel
for someone to admit? the real irony is if the economy does get better, companies will do better and stocks can do better. but bonds, they will almost always do worse. always. i can't think of a single situation where you could own bonds right now, regardless of your age or risk profile. owning a dangerous long-term bond, with that budget deficit we have, come on. i have -- you buy that stuff at 130 versus 100, and first okay, johnson & johnson, common stock with good dividend, and it makes no sense to me, bernanke bashers tell people to sell their bonds. get everyone to sell long-term bond funds, but unless they wise up, these bears will be the enemy of your personal wealth. they have kept you from taking that opportunity and they have no humility and no remorse. nothing. no gain at all. they simply don't think this rally counts. they don't think it matters. and that you couldn't have made any money, and they think that these gains are ill gotten. here is my bottom line. ill gotten gains are gains that are stolen exappropriated or booted. these stock markets gains are totally legitimate, a
to the airport by his friends. he flew there on economy. now next thing that happened in this country, the president is going to fly to rome to be there with pope francis known as francisco for his first mass on sunday, george. >> the pope flies economy. that's something. but one other question -- you say what he was known for is simplicity. is he that well known inside argentina? >> reporter: he's pretty well known as opposed to the other contender based mostly in rome as a diplomat. he was here and met with the people. he was a champion of the poor and he worked very hard to actually help people out in this country and that's why he actually had a pretty decent amount of notoriety here. >> matt gutman, thanks very much. >>> we turn to judge judy. in a twist she could soon be headed to court not as a judge but defendant facing tough questions about expensive goods bought at bargain basement prices. abc's abbie boudreau has the story. >> what are you, crazy. >> reporter: judge judy is used to being on this side of the bench. >> i'm still waiting for your defense. >> reporter: but the
skidding by in this tough economy. >> keith ellison, thank you very much for coming in. >> thank you. >> democratic congressman from minnesota. >>> up next, a surprise for president obama. what our latest poll shows about his job approval. >>> then, an insider from the bush white house is spilling the beans about the march to war in iraq ten years ago. the former bush speech writer is here live. zap technology. arrival. with hertz gold plus rewards, you skip the counters, the lines, and the paperwork. zap. it's our fastest and easiest way to get you into your car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on his portfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> if there was ever a second term honeymoon, it looks like it's over. president obama's j
? cypress, an actual country allegedly, is aiming to rescue the economy by raising 10% of the people's fake accounts. on tuesday lawmakers from the tiny african nation will vote on a plan that will allow them to vacuum up citizen savings. as a condition to receive a 12 billion euro dash that's -- that's not a dollar. and they are rushing to take out their money which lead to the government shutting down all of the banks until at least thursday. most upset about all of this is the russian president, vladimir putin. they are rumored of depositing 19 billion euros in the cypress banks. anyway, let's go live to cypress. >> leave him alone, man. >> almost as good as a hawk eating a mouse video. >> what did this mean for america? and america ferarra as a country. >> cypress is to russia as the caymen islands is to the united states. i don't think it is going to affects our banking system. they had that choice. either that country defaults or they tax the banks and it is the russian money that is in there. >> let's say you have money in the caymen islands. >> oh, i do, greg. >> you probably do. an
of people's savings. bankruptcy could rick shay through the fragile economies of europe straight to the u.s. a vote is expected in cyprus in the next couple of days. >> all right with a ban on supersized soda on hold michael bloomberg now taking aim at tobacco. it's to encourage young people from smoke according to the mayor. >> tobacco targets children, going neighborhoods where the bottom end of the economic ladder and they believe those people are more susceptible to add ads and less able to make the distinction. >> new york has some of the most restrictive antismoking regulations in the country, cigarettes banned in many public parks and other public places as well. >>> brings us to the facebook question of the day. what would you do to stop children from smoking cigarettes? d logon to wnn.com. mayor bloomberg is told to but out. >> when i cover my red wine from my cold, dead fingers i'm taking a stand. >> that's the question, how far do you go if it's really for the kids, how far do you go? >> it's about education. it's good they don't have the commercials on tv but bocks behind the
that it will stay the course, staying the course, of course, means pumping money into the american economy especially concerns about a possible bailout in cyprus flare up. summer won't come soon enough for twinkie lovers. you know who you are. a bankruptcy judge approving hostess' sale to two investment firms and bringing twinkies, ho-hoes and ding dongs back from the dead. the deal said to be worth $410 million. the new owners hope to have twinkies and its snack cake brethren back on your store shelves by summer so you can stop with the locked door in your office and your stash. you'll be able to replenish it soon. and think you can trust labels at the shopping mall? think again. some clothing labeled as being made with fake fur was actually made with real fur. neiman marcus resolve clothing and dr. j.'s dotcom are settling false marketing charges with the federal trade commission. the retailers will not pay any fines but do promise to label all their products correctly going forward or face penalties. imagine if you were going to buy a pair of flats for example, this was a brand-name sli
, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. try align. it's the number one ge recommended probiotic c" that helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ stay in the groove with align. ♪ need help keeping your digestive balance in sync? try align. it's a probiotic that fortifies your digestive system with healthy bacteria 24/7. because your insides set the tone. stay in the groove with align. >>> three years ago, the scene after at fukushima nuclear plant in japan. recall the earthquake and tsunami hit the area, waves knocked out cooling systems to reactors leading to meltdowns at three of them. >> that's right, tens of thousands of people evacuated and they still have not been able to return to their homes. last night a power outage hit the same nuclear plant, and now crews are working to restore some of the cooling systems. >> want to bring in chad meyers. help us understand how the cooling systems work and how dangerous this potentially. >> is a closed system, water pumps in and out of a reactor, the core here is not acting at all but talking about the pool
the things the blood flowing of our economy without oil in its form. we do not have the technology to move past that, and therefore we are at the whim of big oil on a regular basis. the insurance companies and the current medical establishment has the constant resource of funds in the form of an aging population and a consistent and sometimes, you know, you can even create a disease where there is none as far as a label goes and start treating it, whether or not it needs that kind of treating. they have a constant flow of money. there is no way to tamp down, and that's part of i guess the p.r. push of this is that necessary care is used as a way as a hammer against anybody who would want to limit their growth as far as the profit-making industry. it makes it especially as the baby boomer generation ages. let's take a break and when we come back, i would love to hear where you think the next steps can come from, because obviously health care as we have it, a lot of people, you know, said all or nothing. if i can't get a single pair, i don't want it at all, but the protections against preexi
of middle class cayennes and americans who continue to struggle in the obama economy. >> reporter: and house budget chair paul ryan a few minutes ago called it a good week for house republicans, because he says they are presenting the country a budget that balances in a responsible way. jon? jon: seems like a lot of finger pointing still underway on capitol hill. mike emanuel. >> reporter: i guess. jon: thanks. jenna: a key vote is set to take place on a plan that sees up to 10 percent of some bank goes -- deposits in cypress. it's raising a whole lot of questions worldwide because of the precedent it might set. greg talcott is live in london so, greg, how do things stand now in cyprus? >> reporter: jenna, we are less than an hour to the start of a debate on that plan. reports are that plan has been modified to make it a bit easier to take. the reports again say that there will be no tax or levy imposed on depositors around $30,000 or so but anywhere from 7-10% on all deposits after that. some atms are working on the island nation of cyprus, the banks on that island remain closed. there is t
the economy, just as things are getting back on track here. you know, it's a lot for these legislators and the governor to weigh, weighing those sorts of issues with, you know, crimes like this. >> and when will the governor come out and actually sign those bills into law? do you know, jim? >> i believe that's scheduled for later this afternoon. i don't know if that's changed, because of what happened today. i would tend to doubt it, but i think he's scheduled later this afternoon to sign that. >> jim spellman, i'm sure you're still on the case trying to get more information for us and u.s. >> sad story out of colorado springs, colorado this morning. we'll be right back. ♪ [ female announcer ] from meeting customer needs... to meeting patient needs... ♪ wireless is limitless. [ female announcer ] from fiing the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless. mr. wiggles and curling irons. for the little mishaps you feel, use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster neosporin. also try neosporin eczema essentials. all your impor
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)